Wednesday, May 8, 2019

Mental Health Screening During MHM2019

Mental Health Month (MHM) is now 70 years old; the annual observance takes place each May. Mental Health America (MHA) – founded in 1909 – launched MHM in 1949 as a way to reach millions of Americans about mental illness and well-being. A goal of this essential nonprofit is to encourage people to receive screenings and treatment for behavioral health and mood disorders.

One in five Americans face symptoms of a mental disability each year; depression, alone, is the leading cause of poor health globally. The need for screening, diagnosis, and evidence-based treatment is paramount to society.

Throughout May, events are being held across the country to get more people thinking about the importance of mental health. The theme this year is #4Mind4Body, which emphasizes the necessity of both psychological and physical well-being. MHA and its affiliates are exploring how animal companionship, spirituality, humor, work-life balance, and recreation and social connections can improve mental health and general wellness.

There are no cures for mental illnesses; however, symptoms can be managed, and people can recover. Those who prioritize overall well-being can lead fulfilling and productive lives in recovery.

While it’s critical that individuals receive professional assistance, there are things people can do on their own to reign in their illness. MHA offers many tools and helpful guidance for men and women who are struggling. Still, some people are unaware that psychological problems are impacting their lives. Many persons convince themselves that their life issues are circumstantial when it’s likely they meet the criteria for one of several conditions.

Proper screening from primary care physicians (PCP) is crucial, but many people do not have a PCP. Fortunately, there is a quick and easy way to determine whether you are experiencing symptoms of a mental health condition.

 

Mental Health Screening


Before we proceed, we must point out that digital screenings are not an exact science. A screening is not a diagnosis. However, the result of the MHA screening tool can help individuals begin discussions with mental health professionals.

There are numerous mental health conditions, ranging from addiction to schizophrenia. MHA provides effective, research-proven screening tools for some of the more common psychiatric disorders. You can find a list of available screens below:
  • Depression Screen: for individuals who are feeling overwhelming sadness.
  • Anxiety: for people who feel that worry and fear are affecting their ability to function day-to-day.
  • Bipolar Disorder: for individuals who have mood swings - or unusual or extreme shifts in mood and energy.
  • Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD): for those who are affected by a traumatic life event.
  • Alcohol or Substance Use Problems: for helping people determine if their use of alcohol or drugs is an area to address.
  • Psychosis: for young people (age 12-35) who feel like their brain is playing tricks on them (seeing, hearing or believing things that don't seem real or quite right).
  • Eating Disorders: for exploring eating-related concerns that have an impact on your physical health and overall well-being.
Following successful completion of mental health screens, MHA provides resources to help steer people toward assistance. Again, the available tests are not diagnoses; they are meant to help people determine if further action is required.

If you or someone you love is exhibiting concerning behaviors, then taking a mental health screening could be of significant value. More than half of people living with mental illness have not undergone treatment, according to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

MHM2019 is an excellent opportunity for people to take steps to improve their mental health. Once a problem is determined, men and women can take action to enhance their psychological well-being.

 

Co-occurring Disorder Treatment


The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) reports that approximately 10.2 million adults have co-occurring mental health and addiction disorders. In the field of addiction medicine, alcohol and substance use diseases are impacted by other forms of mental illness. It is vital that men and women meeting the criteria for dual-diagnosis receive treatment for all conditions present.

Those who believe they are struggling with addiction and a co-occurring mental illness are strongly encouraged to seek help. At Hemet Valley Recovery Center & Sage Retreat, we can provide detoxification and treatment services to people impacted by mental health disorders. Please contact us today to learn more about our Chemical Dependency Rehabilitation Hospital (CDRH).

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