Thursday, July 26, 2018

Trauma and Addiction Recovery Is Possible

addiction
Do you work in a field that adds stress to your life? If so, do you drink alcohol or use drugs in order to cope with your feelings about your work or the feelings employment experiences elicit? You may not know this, but using mind-altering substances to deal with life stressors can be a slippery slope to problems, notably that of use disorders.

In the United States, it is common practice for adults to have a few beers or a couple of glasses of wine after work. After all, it is within people’s rights to do so; however, for some individuals, the practice ends up exacerbating the negative feelings that one is trying to counter. Nowhere is this truer than people who work in fields that expose them to trauma.

It is not uncommon for people working in the fields of medicine, first response, and the military, to turn to alcohol and substance use to cope. Which makes sense, considering that people in those lines of work are more likely to confront psychiatric conditions like post-traumatic stress disorder or depression. Individuals facing such circumstances, typically rely on drink and drugs to mute or dull their symptoms; the practice regularly leads to a dual diagnosis.

 

First Responders Struggle With Mental Illness


Citing a University of Phoenix survey, the American Psychiatric Association points out that approximately 85 percent of first responders had experienced symptoms of mental illness; what’s more, some 34 percent of respondents report a mental disorder diagnosis, and:
  • More than a quarter diagnosed with depression,
  • one in 10 diagnosed with PTSD; and,
  • 46 percent had experienced anxiety.
There is a significant body of evidence online and in research journals that indicate an increased likelihood of alcohol and substance use disorders among first responders. The reality is that when conditions like depression and PTSD are left untreated, many will resort to substance use as a coping mechanism. The practice doesn’t fix the problem; it makes it worse.

It’s vital that people working in fields that involve a high risk of trauma, and also misuse drugs and alcohol, seek treatment as a path to recovery. When addiction and co-occurring mental illnesses receive simultaneous treatment, long-term recovery is possible.


HVRC Heroes Program


At Hemet Valley Recovery Center & Sage Retreat, we offer a program that caters to the unique needs of individuals struggling with employment-induced trauma. Our team of highly trained addiction professionals can help you or a loved one break the cycle of addiction and learn how to cope with the symptoms of co-occurring mental illness. Please contact us to receive a complimentary assessment and discuss treatment options.

Thursday, July 12, 2018

Safeguarding Your Recovery from Relapse

Relapse is something that everyone in recovery strives, day in and day out, to avoid. Working a program is hard, and it requires a tremendous amount of dedication, for myriad reasons in the blink of an eye (seemingly) all your efforts can go down the drain. To be clear, we are talking about more than just losing all the time you have put into a program of recovery, in some cases a slip back to use, is fatal, especially when it comes to opioids.

Naturally, going to meetings and fostering a “deep bench” support network can help you steer clear of situations that can result in a return to using drugs and alcohol. Following the directions of people who’ve been in the program longer, is invaluable in bringing about lasting progress. Nobody is perfect, nor are you expected to always get things right regarding your actions; but, today you have a means of correcting misguided thinking and behaviors before they devolve into something much worse.

We cannot stress enough the importance of keeping exceptionally close ties to your support group in the first years of recovery. Addiction is a lifelong disease with no known antidote which means that you will have to be ever vigilant in managing your condition in healthy ways. Fortunately, there are several approaches you can take to improving your life and, as a result, prevent relapse.

 

Safeguarding Your Recovery


Staying present in recovery is of vital importance. Romanticizing about your past or future-tripping are sure paths to drugs and alcohol. Addicts and alcoholics have a unique ability to quickly forget the negative aspects of their history and deluding themselves into thinking, ‘this time might be different.’ Merely put, if mind-altering substances caused you the kind of problems that demanded recovery in the first place, it stands to reason that bad memories outweigh the good times. If you find yourself thinking it would be nice to have a beer on a hot day this summer, and without getting down on yourself, replay a snippet of the tape that is your substance abuse history. Pretty quickly you’ll grasp why having that Corona is not worth what comes after the bottle goes dry.

relapse
Getting a healthy amount of sleep is another way you can protect your recovery from relapse. Rest is key to a robust program, but unfortunately, many people in recovery take getting ZZZs for granted. If you are not well rested, then you are far more likely to make rash decisions that are not in accord with your best interests. People who are tired all the time lack the energy that they must put toward their daily commitment to recovery.

If you find it difficult to get to sleep at a decent hour, it may be due to some of your behaviors after the sun goes down. Scientists tell us that eating late or watching television before bed can make it more difficult to fall asleep and stay asleep. The brain cycles throughout the night about every 90 minutes; REM sleep is when your brain and body are energized. If you are not staying asleep, it means you are losing out on a vital revitalization process which is essential for function in a healthy way the next day.

Lastly, do whatever you can to stay away from situations involving people using drugs and alcohol. It seems obvious, but it is easy to forget how dangerous it can be to see people getting intoxicated. You may feel secure enough to go into a bar for something that doesn’t involve drinking, but ask yourself, ‘is it worth it?’

 

Relapse Prevention


Hemet Valley Recovery Center and Sage Retreat can assist you, or a loved one in beginning a journey of recovery. A significant component of our program is relapse prevention; our highly trained addiction counselors teach clients techniques for protecting their program form relapse. Please contact us today to learn more about how we can help you achieve lasting changes.